CONTENT STRATEGY
Why I Love Being a Content Strategist
Written by Rebecca Steurer, Content Academy® Co-Founder & Content Strategist
Rebecca has been a content strategist for close to 20 years. She is the founder of ContentRS – Making content real simple and co-founder of Content Academy. You can email Rebecca with questions about content strategy at [email protected].
Love is a strong word, but I feel it’s the best word to describe how I feel about my career as a content strategist. Being a content strategist has given me the opportunity to utilize every spectrum of the brain, from creativity to linear thinking to critical thinking to communication (both online and in-person). Here are my top three reasons why I love being a content strategist.

 

1. My day is never dull
.

As demonstrated in my blog post, Top 10 Tasks of a Content Strategist, from 2014, a career in content strategy is not one of completing mundane tasks. My daily tasks range from creative to organizational to technical. Here are a few examples of what I get to do:

• Assess and define content needs
• Plan content development
• Ensure that voice, tone and message is consistent and on-track with the bigger vision
• Work closely with user experience architects and designers to make sure the message is consistent and appropriately positioned
• Work closely with visual designers to ensure message is captured properly with images and design
• Work closely with the technical team to ensure that content will be displayed properly and posted easily
• Define the governance and workflow to maintain a relatively easy process
• Manage people, process, editorial calendars and ideas
• Schedule content postings
• Train people how to develop content and post

 

2. I get to work with and learn from creative and technical people.

From User Experience Architects (UX)  to Creatives  to Technical Designers, content strategists is smack dab in the middle of the work.

Working with User Experience Architects
When working with user experience architects (UX’ers) my job is to figure out what content is needed for every page. The UX’er’s job is to figure out how to display the content. Working collaboratively makes both of our jobs easier because we are able to account for the right content and make sure it was presented in the right way for the right audience (that’s the definition of content strategy).

Working with Creatives
By “creatives,” I mean visual designers and copywriters. This is the part of the job where I can use the creative side of my brain. Working with the creative team, I need to provide them with details about the brand voice, tone based on the user journey and keywords that need to be used for the audience and Google. What’s so great about working with creatives is they can envision taking boring words and replace them with visual appear that will connect with the reader.

Working with Technical Designers
Back to the strategy side of the brain. Working with Technical Designers is rewarding because I feel as though I’m truly helping to build the site. A content strategist can be a huge support to make the technical team get their work done quickly and without having to guess how the content works together (taxonomy).

 

3. I can pay my bills and have extra to save.

Andy Crestodina from Orbit Media posted, 7 Marketing Job Descriptions and Salaries. How Much Do Marketers Make Per Year? and a career in content strategy continues to increase in salary! Content strategists are in high demand, yet there is still so few available to fill the gap. If there is a time to change your career to content strategy, now is the time!
Are you ready to start a career in content strategy?

 

Is becoming a content strategist right for you?

Need more convincing to start a career in content strategy? Check out my live and on-demand webinars where I share information and insights into content strategy best practices. Or, feel free to email me directly at [email protected].

Interested in Becoming a Content Strategist?

Take Rebecca’s Applied Content Strategy
Online Course

Enroll for the Winter Semester, February 12 – April 23, 2018

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